• The Rep - A Dolls House
  • The Rep - Admissions

Loop Safety Remains Topic Of Discussion


March 31 shooting has U. City council looking for solutions



LoopSafety
shadow
file photo (click for larger version)
April 11, 2012
Following a March-ending weekend of violence in the Loop that included a shooting, University City officials continue to look for ways to ensure that the popular Loop remains safe and appealing to visitors.

On Saturday, March 31, at about 8:30 p.m., fights broke out among young people in the area around Delmar and Skinker boulevards in St. Louis city. Then, at about 11 p.m., shots were fired in the parking lot of Church's Chicken at 6190 Delmar. A 19-year-old man was shot under his left armpit, and a 17-year-old boy was shot in his abdomen.

At the April 9 University City Council meeting, Councilman Byron Price said he had been in the Loop on the Saturday night when violence broke out.

"I was there the night of the incident (the shooting) and I saw mobs of kids and most of them did not appear to be 18 or older. They appeared to be 10 or 11 years old, or even younger," Price said.

Price asked City Manager Lehman Walker what actions were being taken to address the issue, and if a meeting could be arranged between University City Police Chief Charles Adams and the council.

"They (the youth) were walking through the crowds of people who were eating outside, and a lot of people started getting up and going inside and I don't blame them. This was not an isolated situation," Price said.

Walker said the police department has increased its presence in the Loop in recent weeks, in part due to the expectation of large crowds drawn to the area by the nice weather. He said University City will install surveillance cameras in the Loop. Additionally, he said the city would be looking at adopting a zero tolerance policy, but did not go into details.

"A zero tolerance policy could mean a lot of things. I don't want to see a 6-year-old being dragged down the street by police. We need to get on top of this. I don't want to leave it up to the city of St. Louis to protect U. City. U. City should protect U. City," Price said.

Several council members agreed with Price.

"Mr. Price is right, this was not an anomaly. I was in the Loop also, and lots of the kids did not look like teenagers, they looked really young," said Councilman Steve Kraft. "Maybe it is time that the city (of St. Louis) stepped up to the plate and coordinated their curfew with our curfew."

University City has a 9 p.m. curfew for those 16 and younger, while the curfew in the city of St. Louis is later. Several members of the council pointed out that as the University City curfew goes into effect, many youths head east into St. Louis, near the intersection of Delmar and Skinker.

There they congregate in front of businesses which include a Southwestern Bell office, a gas station and a Church's Chicken restaurant. It was at the latter where the shooting took place.

Councilman Michael Glickert was unhappy with how the situation was handled.

" It was a disaster, We weren't ready. I hope we are ready next time, but I hope it does not happen again. I hope Mr. Walker will talk with the police chief and that we work closer with St. Louis city and with Washington University's police department. This is a regional issue."

Mayor Shelly Welsch said that the day after the shooting she met with St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, St. Louis Police Chief Dan Isom, and city Alderman Lyda Krewson. She said city representatives suggested that establishing an earlier curfew in the city could have a negative impact on the city's other entertainment areas, such as South Grand or the Central West End.

"The issue that we have to deal with is a regional one," said Welsch. "Parents (from around the area) are dropping their kids off in the Loop and then coming back a few hours later to pick them up. We also should not let a small number of people who are the cause of the problem darken the name of all of our youth."

Welsch said she was told by Chief Isom that on March 31, the night of the shooting, that about 20 people were responsible for the majority of the problems. Welsch said there were 20 University City police officers in the Loop that evening, and 15 officers from St. Louis. Those 15 officers were later joined by 35 to 40 more St. Louis officers.

"We are working closely with the city," said University City Manager Lehman Walker. Walker estimates there were 1,000 to 1,500 youths in the Loop on the night of March 31. "The (events) did not occur in University City, they occurred in St. Louis city, where we do not have jurisdiction. We doubled our police presence that particular weekend, and the city also increased its presence."

There they congregate in front of businesses which include a Southwestern Bell office, a gas station and a Church's Chicken restaurant. It was at the latter where the shooting took place.

Councilman Michael Glickert was unhappy with how the situation was handled.

"It was a disaster. We weren't ready," he said. "I hope we are ready next time, but I hope it does not happen again. I hope Mr. Walker will talk with the police chief and that we work closer with St. Louis city and with Washington University's police department. This is a regional issue."

Mayor Shelly Welsch said the day after the shooting she met with St. Louis Mayor Francis Slay, St. Louis Police Chief Dan Isom and city Alderman Lyda Krewson. She said city representatives suggested that establishing an earlier curfew in the city could have a negative impact on the city's other entertainment areas, such as South Grand, the Central West End or Grand Center.

"The issue that we have to deal with is a regional one," said Welsch. "Parents (from around the area) are dropping their kids off in the Loop and then coming back a few hours later to pick them up. We also should not let a small number of people who are the cause of the problem darken the name of all of our youth."

Welsch said she was told by Chief Isom that on March 31, the night of the shooting, about 20 people were responsible for the majority of the problems. Welsch said there were 20 University City police officers in the Loop that evening, and 15 officers from St. Louis. Those 15 officers were later joined by 35 to 40 more St. Louis officers.

"We are working closely with the city," Walker said, estimating there were 1,000 to 1,500 youths in the Loop on the night of March 31. "The (events) did not occur in University City, they occurred in St. Louis city, where we do not have jurisdiction. We doubled our police presence that particular weekend and the city also increased its presence."

  • Grand Rivers Kentucky
  • Apex Network
  • Lemcke Appliance 062818
Jerde Eye Specialists
Barbara Balossi - KW
Ellington
Solstice Senior Living
Quincy Illinois 082418
Posey County Indiana
Ste Genevieve 082418
Old Republic Title
Farmington, MO
Postnet
S M T W T F S

123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
28293031
  • Barbara Balossi - KW
imageimage
image
image
Terms of Service | Code of Conduct | Privacy Policy | Security Policy | Refund Policy
Webster-Kirkwood Times, Inc. - copyright 2018
122 W. Lockwood Ave., Webster Groves, MO 63119 314-968-2699